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  • 1800-1849
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Gérard De Nerval

The International Encyclopedia of Surrealism Volume 1 : Movements

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2019

Encyclopedia Article

...“In homage to Guillaume Apollinaire . . ., Soupault and I baptised the new mode of pure expression which we had at our disposal . . . by the name SURREALISM . . . To be even fairer, we could probably have taken over the word SUPERNATURALISM...

Karl Marx

Michael Richardson

Michael Richardson is Visiting Fellow in the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths University of London, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The International Encyclopedia of Surrealism Volume 1 : Movements

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2019

Encyclopedia Article

...Beyond whatever relationship surrealism has with Marxism as a philosophical idea or with communism as a social or political movement, the person of Karl Marx—in the example he set in both his life and his work—has played a significant part...

Gustave Moreau

The International Encyclopedia of Surrealism Volume 1 : Movements

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2019

Encyclopedia Article

...Gustave Moreau was a French painter active in the second half of the nineteenth century. His work is characterized stylistically by its ornamental detail, arabesques, and a sumptuous use of color, and thematically by its fusional approach...

Dream

Georges Sebbag

A writer with a doctorate in philosophy, Georges Sebbag participated in the activities of the surrealist group in Paris from 1964 to 1969. He has written texts on time and many books about surrealism. His most recent are Potence avec paratonnerre, Surréalisme et philosophie (2012) and Foucault Deleuze, Nouvelles Impressions du Surréalisme (2015). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The International Encyclopedia of Surrealism Volume 1 : Movements

Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2019

Encyclopedia Article

...The surrealists believe in the “omnipotence” of dream. They noted their dreams and published them without interpreting them. Although the dream according to Freud is the royal road to the unconscious, the surrealists agree with Grandville...